Suggested Elective Courses

Below are recommended electives for the MSCI degree. To review the electives in list form, click here.  For a list of all courses offered at Washington University see WebSTAC.

  • Days and times listed represent when the course is typically offered. Be sure to confirm the days and times in WebSTAC for the specific semester you are interested in.
  • Course numbers starting with a letter other than “M” might be held on the Danforth* campus. Be sure to check the location in WebSTAC when registering.
  • Courses referred to as “hybrid online” contain a mix of face-to-face sessions and online sessions.
  • If you are an open enrollment student interested in taking any of these classes, please contact the program directly who is offering the class.

All courses below have been approved as electives for the MSCI degree. For courses not listed, individual MSCI Director approvals can be requested by completing the Elective Justification Form (doc) and sending it to the CRTC.

Any M88 courses can be used as AHBR electives if not already a part of your core. To request a course not on this list as an elective, contact ahbr@email.wustl.edu to discuss the process to obtain permission.

Data Management and Bioinformatics Courses

Applied Data Management (3 credits) M88-548 Syllabus (pdf)
This class is an advanced seminar intended for students in the health and social sciences who plan to engage in applied research. This course is a survey of important data management topics and techniques including: data programming and manipulation, data storage and security, data cleaning, relational database theory, and legal and ethical issues of data management. Prerequisite M88-525 Introduction to Biostatistics. Evening, Spring Semester beginning 2017.

Introduction to Biomedical Informatics I: Foundations (3 credits) M17-5302
This survey course provides an overview of the theories and methods that comprise the field of biomedical informatics. Topics to be covered include: 1) information architecture as applied to the biomedical computing domain; 2) data and interoperability standards; 3) biological, clinical, and population health relevant data analytics; 4) healthcare information systems; 5) human factors and cognitive science; 6) evaluation of biomedical computing applications; and 7) ethical, legal, and social implications of technology solutions as applied to the field of biomedicine. The course will consist of both didactic lectures as well as experiential learning opportunities including “hands on” laboratory sessions and journal club style discussion. The course will culminate with a capstone project requiring the in-depth examination, critique and presentation of a student-selected topic related to the broad field of biomedical informatics. Biomedical Informatics I is designed primarily for individuals with a background in the health and/or life sciences and who have completed a course in introductory statistics (e.g., MATH 1011). No assumptions are made about computer science or clinical background; however, some experience with computers and a high-level familiarity with health care will be useful. This course does not require any programming knowledge, and it will not teach students how to program. Mondays, 4:00-7:00pm. Fall Semester.

Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 credits) M21-550
Intensive eleven-day summer course designed to provide broad exposure to the basic concepts, methodology and application of bioinformatics to solve biological problems, including basics of online genomic databases and database mining tools, mathematical algorithms in genome sequence analysis (alignment analysis, gene finding/predicting), gene expression microarray (genechip) analysis, and of the impact of recent developments such as protein microarrays or whole-genome DNA chips for genome-wide association studies. Students will also take computer labs and learn basics of bioinformatics tools and databases (BLAST/WUBLAST, Prospector, etc.), practice basics of R/Bioconductor programming, and apply specialized R packages to solve bioinformatics problems pertinent to real medical research of human diseases. Auditors will not have access to the computer lab sessions. M21-506, R Primer, is a prerequisite. Daily 9:00-4:30pm over 11 days. Summer Semester.

Using Administrative Data for Health Services Research (3 credits) M19-5254 Syllabus (pdf)
The objective of this advanced graduate course is to prepare highly motivated students to perform health services research using administrative data. Lectures will provide tutorials on national administrative databases, review journal articles using these databases, instruction in SAS programming and application of health services research methods using administrative databases. Strengths and limitations of large databases that are commonly used for research will be considered, and special attention will be devoted to large federal databases that are readily available to new investigators. Students will learn how to obtain, link, and analyze large databases, understand the key issues related to data security and confidentiality, and become knowledgeable about key methodologic issues in observational studies using administrative data. Students will evaluate published studies based on large administrative databases, develop a health services research proposal and complete a short research project that uses administrative data. Course note: You must contact the instructor two weeks prior to the start of class to discuss ideas for the class project; M19-501 and M21-560 are required prerequisites; SAS or SPSS software required. Thursdays 10:00am-1:00pm. Spring Semester.

Bio-Entrepreneurship Courses

Biotech Industry Innovators/Basics of Bio-Entrepreneurship (3 credits) L41-5014/B63-500U*
This course investigates issues and choices that inventors / scientists encounter when they are considering the applications and commercialization of early stage scientific discoveries. This course is intended for anyone interested in working in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical device, or life-sciences industries as a founder, scientist, entrepreneur, manager, consultant, or investor. It focuses, through case studies and lectures, on the issues and decision processes that researchers and their business partners typically face when considering how a discovery might best be moved from academia to successful commercialization. Wednesdays 5:30-8:30pm. Spring Semester.

Business Planning for New Enterprises [The Hatchery] (3 credits) B63-524*
In this course, student teams pursue their own business idea or support outside entrepreneurs by researching, writing, and pitching business plans for new commercial or social ventures. Enrolled students can recruit a team to work on their own business idea, or can join a team working on another’s idea. Outside entrepreneurs and scientific researchers wishing to recruit student teams must apply in advance to be considered for student selection. Most of the work is done outside the classroom with the support of mentors, advisors and the instructor. Classes are held once per week for the first half of the semester. Workshops and rehearsals are required in the second part of the term. Students make final presentations to a panel of outside judges including venture capitalists, angel investors, entrepreneurs and people involved with early stage ventures. Prerequisites: Introduction to Entrepreneurship (MGT 421 or MGT 521), Social Entrepreneurship (MGT 500T or S-50-5060) or permission of the instructor. Tuesdays 4:00-6:00pm. Spring Semester.

CEL Entrepreneur Consulting Team (3 credits) B63-550X*
Early stage companies provide a unique environment for students to make a meaningful impact on the future trajectory of a growing organization. CELect is an experiential learning course that matches teams of Washington University students with St. Louis area start-up ventures to perform defined management consulting projects. In addition to the required day-long orientation and concluding sessions taught at the T-REx incubator downtown, students will work directly with the professor and with their client company on a consistent, but variable, schedule depending on the project needs over the course of the semester. In addition to being embedded on a project for an early stage company, students will have the opportunity to engage with other entrepreneurship support organizations such as local accelerators, venture capital firms, and incubators. Once accepted, students may not drop this class. Enrollment is limited. Independent Study. Fall and Spring Semesters.

Drug and Device Development (3 credits) M17-518 Syllabus (pdf)
This course will provide an overview of the commercial development pathways for both pharmaceuticals and medical devices, from inception to market. Through lectures and discussions, students will gain an appreciation for the role clinical study programs play in the broader scope of product development. Class topics will include preclinical, clinical, regulatory, and marketing factors which influence discovery and development of new medical products. Thursdays, 5:30-8:00pm. Fall Semester.

Entrepreneurial Teaming for the Entrepreneurship Platform (.5 credits) B63-560C*
One day conference on entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship students should graduate with not only the needed academic skills necessary to pursue careers in entrepreneurship, but also with a practical savvy that can only come from real world experience, relationships, and context. Friday 9:00-3:00pm. Fall Semester.

Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3 credits) B63-521*
This course is designed not only for the student with a burning passion to start his/her own business, but anyone who believes that entrepreneurial skills are an essential element of business success. It is taught primarily via the case method. Most case discussions will be followed by a relevant guest speaker, an experienced entrepreneur or a professional from the investment community. You will hear from entrepreneurs and corporate managers with an entrepreneurial flair, some who have experienced great success, and others for whom success has been elusive. The structure of this course follows the evolutionary process of a new venture. Topics covered include: Idea Assessment, Organization Formation, Capitalization, Growth, and Exit. Corporate Entrepreneurship also will be explored. Mondays and Wednesdays 1:00-2:30pm. Spring Semester. Weekend course option also available in the Fall Semester.

Introduction to Evidence Based Entrepreneurship (1 credit) M17-542 Syllabus (pdf)
This course provides an overview on how to identify viable new venture concepts in the biomedical field, build plans for a sustainable and scalable enterprise, and get ventures off the ground. In addition to the workshop, students will engage in hands on practice applying these concepts to their own venture capital idea as well as be exposed to venture capital resources available at Washington University and in the local St. Louis area. This class is specifically targeted at scholars already holding or currently pursuing an advanced degree in a health science field.  Mondays, 4:00-5:30pm. Spring Semester.

Industry Partnering: Collaborations in Translational Research (3 credits) M17-519 Syllabus (pdf)
Innovative new products are the life blood of the biopharmaceutical industry. In the U.S., most discovery research originates at the university level and is transferred via licensing agreements to industry partners or to start-up biotech companies for final development and commercialization. The process of moving this innovation from the lab to industry and then to the patient is the focus of this course. The course examines the market for intellectual property that exists between academic institutions and the private sector and explores commercialization of translational research through collaboration with industry partners. In addition to studying the complex relationship between science and business, the course employs a case study methodology to illustrate specific examples of the translational process from lab to marketed product. Tuesdays, 5:30-8:00pm. Spring Semester.

Pharmaceutical Research and Development (3 credits) L41-519
The course will provide an overview of the history of pharmaceutical research and development activities, with emphasis upon understanding a blend of the scientific, public health, regulatory and business decisions that have shaped the pharmaceutical industry over the past eight decades. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding how past trends have raised questions about the sustainability of the enterprise. Although no prerequisites are formally requires, the course will blend basic understanding of scientific and medical terminology with an understanding of the commercial and policy decision-making processes that govern the pharmaceutical and biotechnology enterprises. Tuesdays & Thursdays, 3:30-5:00pm. Fall Semester.

Epidemiology/Methods Courses

Applied Epidemiology (3 credits) M19-600 Syllabus (pdf)
This final course in the epidemiologic methods sequence provides students with the opportunity to apply methods and principles learned in previous courses to the development of a grant application. Students will prepare this grant application on a research question of their own choosing and in the format expected for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) R03, R21, or K grant application (research plan only). Students will also have the opportunity to evaluate research proposals for scientific merit. Course activities: lectures, class discussion, and presentation and critique of individual grants. Course note: M19-502 and M19-511 are required prerequisites (M17-589 can be substituted with instructor approval). This course cannot be taken pass/fail. Tuesdays 1:00-4:00pm. Spring Semester.

Applied Qualitative Methods for Health Research (3 credits) M19-532 Syllabus (pdf)
This course will introduce students to the most commonly used qualitative methods for medical-related research. It will provide a foundation in the application of qualitative methods to medical and health research. Topics addressed will include uses of qualitative data, designing studies, sampling strategies, collecting data, and qualitative analysis. A variety of methods will be discussed, with an emphasis on using focus groups and various interviewing techniques. Students will learn the best practices in qualitative research and how to critically evaluate qualitative studies and articles. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to plan, conduct, and analyze a qualitative study. Course activities: lectures, discussion, article critiques, and paper. Tuesdays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

Comparative Effectiveness Research (2 credits) M19-5252 Syllabus (pdf)
This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to comparative effectiveness research. Topics include an overview of comparative effectiveness research, stakeholder engagement in comparative effectiveness research, designing comparative effectiveness research methodologic challenges in doing comparative effectiveness research, and recent developments in PCORI and Federal policy. Students will be expected to review and evaluate comparative effectiveness studies as well as actively participate in class discussions. Course note: M19-501 (M17-513 or M17-588 can be substituted with instructor approval) and M21-560 are required prerequisites. Fridays 1:00-3:00pm. Spring Semester.

Epidemiology of Psychiatric Disorders Across the Lifespan (3 credits) M19-561 Syllabus (pdf)
This course takes an integrated developmental approach to the epidemiology, etiology and evolving nosology of psychiatric disorders. The course is organized into four sections. Part I lays most of the conceptual groundwork needed to understand and plan research on psychiatric disorders and their risk factors in the general population. The next two sections mostly focus on the nosology, epidemiology and etiology of specific psychiatric disorders. Part II covers disorders that are traditionally considered child psychiatric disorders but have developmental consequences for adulthood and/or often persist chronically through adulthood. Part III covers psychiatric disorders more typical of adulthood as well as those that often emerge in adolescence or earlier but are more prevalent in adulthood. Finally, Part IV will be devoted to special topics in psychiatric and developmental epidemiology. By the end of the course, students with sufficient statistical background will be expected to design and conduct basic analyses of existing psychiatric epidemiologic data and others will be expected to conduct a literature review on a topic of their choice. Alternatively, students will have the option to prepare a poster submission and poster to submit to a meeting of their choice. Course note: Students are strongly encouraged to have taken or be concurrently enrolled in M21-560 Biostatistics I or equivalent biostatistics course. Course master approval is required to waive this prerequisite. Fridays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

Epidemiology Methods (3 credits) S55-5011*
This course extends the concepts and methods of epidemiology from S55-5002, providing an in-depth exploration of concepts and skills in epidemiologic research, including analytic reasoning and study design, execution, data analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: S55-5002 and S55-5003 or equivalent. Days and times vary. Spring Semester.

Global Burden of Disease: Methods and Applications (3 credits) M19-5656 Syllabus (pdf)
This transdisciplinary course provides an overview of the quantitative and qualitative methods and their applications for studying the global burden of diseases. The topics cover infectious diseases, non-communicable chronic medical illness and behavioral disorders. At the end of this course, students will have learned basic methods used for global health research and major trends in global burden of diseases; they will be able to apply the knowledge of measurements to forecast the future of the global burden of specific diseases of interest to develop needed policy recommendations. Students will be able to address prevention and intervention strategies targeted to specific nations or regions using a transdisciplinary approach. Students will have learned major dimensions of sociocultural and economic factors that affect global and regional distributions of major disease categories and how they are linked to global trade and economy in some instances. The transdisciplinary knowledge and hands-on skills learned from this course will assist students with an interest in international research to select a disease or underlying condition with a significant burden on the population of diverse nations or regions. Students will acquire practical skills that can be used in the health professions, including cultural competency training as it applies to medicine and public health. Course activities: Lectures, transdisciplinary class discussion and exercises, homework, and transdisciplinary team presentations. Thursdays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

Intermediate Clinical Epidemiology (3 credits) M19-502 Syllabus (pdf)
The second course in the Epidemiology series, this course builds upon the basic principles and methods of epidemiology and introduces additional tools and concepts that are critical to a comprehensive study design. Topics include: risk and association; sampling strategies; interaction; confounding; adjustment; lifetables; applied causal inference; validity and reliability; social epidemiology; and approaches to data analysis. Upon exiting this course, students will be prepared to approach the study design portion of a protocol, as required by the final course in the Epidemiology series. Course activities: lectures, midterm and final exams, class participation, problem sets and papers. Course note: M19-501 is a required prerequisite (M17-588 or M17-513 can be substituted with instructor approval); SAS software is required for this course. Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:00am-12:00pm. Second half Fall Semester.

Introduction to Dissemination and Implementation Science (1 credit) M19-563 Syllabus (pdf)
This course provides an introduction to dissemination and implementation (D&I) science (i.e., translational research in health). Topics include the importance and language of D&I science; designs, methods and measures; differences and similarities across clinical, public health and policy settings; selected tools for D&I research and practice; and future issues. Course activities: Lectures, class discussions, manuscript critiques, and class project (culminating in a poster). Wednesdays 1:00-4:00pm. Four weeks during Spring Semester.

Planning, Implementation & Evaluation Evidence-Based Programs & Interventions (3 credits) S55-5240*
his course focuses focusing on program evaluation, outcomes research, cost effectiveness research, methods for executing and evaluating health education intervention plans, quantitative and qualitative methods and their application to public health practice. Pre-requisite: S55-5000 Research Methods (May be able to substitute M17-513 or M17-588 with instructor approval). Days and times vary. Spring Semester.

Randomized Controlled Trials (3 credits) M19-550 Syllabus (pdf)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to randomized controlled clinical trials. Topics include types of clinical trials research (efficacy and effectiveness trials), study design, treatment allocation, randomization and stratification, quality control, analysis, sample size requirements, patient consent, data safety and monitoring plans, reporting standards, and interpretation of results. Course activities: lectures, manuscript critiques, class project, and paper. Course note: Students are strongly encouraged to have taken or be concurrently enrolled in M19-511 or M17-522. Mondays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

Survey Methods: Design and Evaluation (3 credits) M88-560 Syllabus (pdf)
Learn survey design, planning and implementation, sampling and data collection procedures and survey data analysis and interpretation in public health research. Evening, Fall Semester.

Genetics/Genomics Courses

Advanced Genetics (3 credits) L41-5491*
Fundamental aspects of organismal genetics with emphasis on experimental studies that have contributed to the molecular analysis of complex biological problems. Examples drawn from bacteria, yeast, nematodes, fruit flies and mammalian systems. Prerequisite, graduate standing or permission of instructor. Mondays 12:00-1:00pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:30-3:00pm. Spring Semester.

Computational Statistical Genetics (3 credits) M21-621
This course covers the theory and application of both classical and advanced algorithms for estimating parameters and testing genomic hypotheses connecting genotype to phenotype. Students learn the key methods by writing their own program to do (simplified) linkage analysis in pedigrees in SAS for a simulated dataset provided by the coursemaster. Topics covered in the course include Maximum Likelihood theory for pedigrees and unrelated individuals, Maximization routines such as Newton-Raphson and the E-M Algorithm, Path analysis, Variance components, Mixed model algorithms, the Elston-Stewart and Lander-Green Algorithms, Simulated Annealing and the Metropolis Hastings algorithm, Bayesian and MCMC methods, Hidden Markov Models, Coalescent Theory, Haplotyping Algorithms, Genetic Imputation Algorithms, Permutation/Randomization Tests, classification and Data Mining Algorithms, Population Stratification and Admixture Mapping Methods, Loss of Heterozygosity models, Gene Networks, Copy Number Variation methods, Multiple comparisons corrections and Power and Monte-carlo simulation experiments. Course not available to auditors. Prerequisite: M21-5483 Human Linkage & Association, M21-560 Biostatistics I, and M21-570 Biostatistics II or, with permission of the Course Master, the equivalents. Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:00-10:30am. Spring Semester.

Fundamentals of Genetic Epidemiology (3 credits) M21-515
Intensive eleven-day summer course. Lectures cover causes of phenotypic variation, familial resemblance and heritability, Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, ascertainment, study designs and basic concepts in genetic segregation, linkage and association. The computer laboratory portion is designed as hands-on practice of fundamental concepts. Students will gain practical experience with various genetics computer programs (e.g. SOLAR, MERLIN, QTDT, and PLINK). Auditors will not have access to the computer lab sessions. Required: Familiarity with Excel and attendance at June Computing Orientation and UNIX training. Recommended: Facility with R programming language. Daily 9:00-4:30pm for 2 weeks in Summer Semester.

Fundamentals of Mammalian Genetics (3 credits) L41-5285*
This course aims to provide both biologists and those with mathematical backgrounds with a basis in mammalian genetics. The course will include the following modules: Nucleic acid biochemistry; Gene and chromosome organization; Introduction to Human Genetics; Mutations and DNA repair; Cancer Genetics; Genomic methodologies; Biochemical genetics; Murine Genetics; Epigenetics; Neurodegenerative diseases; Mitochondrial disorders; Pharmacogenetics; Introduction to human population genetics; Applications of modern human genetics; Introduction to web-based informatics tools for molecular genetics. One of the required courses in the Quantitative Human Statistical Genetics graduate program. Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-5:00pm. Fall Semester.

Genomics (3-4 credits) L41-5488*
This course is designed for beginning students who want to become familiar with basic concepts and applications of genomics. It covers a wide range of topics including how genomes are mapped and sequenced as well as the latest computational and experimental techniques for predicting genes, splice sites, and promoter elements. High throughput techniques for ascribing function to DNA, RNA, and protein sequences including microarrays, mass spectrometry, interspecies genome comparisons and genome-wide knock-out collections will also be discussed. Finally, the use of genomic techniques and resources for studies of human disease will be discussed. A heavy emphasis will be put on students acquiring the basic skills needed to navigate databases that archive sequence data, expression data and other types of genome-wide data. Through problem sets the students will learn to manipulate and analyze the large data sets that accompany genomic analyses by writing simple computer scripts. Because of limited space in our teaching lab, enrollment for lab credit will be limited to 24 students. If you have previous experience in computer programming, we ask that you do not enroll for the laboratory credit. Prerequisites, Molecular Cell Biology (Bio 5068), Nucleic Acids (Bio 548) or by permission of instructor. To enroll in just the lecture section, register for 3 credits. To enroll in both the lecture and lab sections, register for 4 credits. Mondays and Wednesdays 10:00-11:00am, Friday lab 10:00-11:30am. Spring Semester.

Genomics in Medicine I (1 credit) M17-532  Syllabus (pdf)
This course introduces principles of genomics in medicine as they apply to clinical research and provides a practical background in molecular biology and genetics.  Students will be provided with an introduction to genomic research and applications of genomic technologies in the research environment and an understanding of the clinical application of genetic/genomic knowledge.  Critical thinking and scientific/analytic competencies are emphasized throughout the course. Wednesdays, 4:00-5:00pm. Fall Semester.

Genomics in Medicine II (1 credit) M17-533 Syllabus (pdf)
This is the second course in the Genomics in Medicine sequence.  This course introduces principles of genomics in medicine as they apply to clinical research and provides a practical background in molecular biology and genetics.  Students will be provided with an introduction to genomic research and applications of genomic technologies in the research environment and an understanding of the clinical application of genetic/genomic knowledge.  Critical thinking and scientific/analytic competencies are emphasized throughout the course. Note you can enroll in this course if you have not taken M17-532. Wednesdays, 4:00-5:00pm. Spring Semester.

Human Linkage and Association Analysis (3 credits) M21-5483
Basic Genetic concepts: meiosis, inheritance, Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, Linkage, segregation analysis; Linkage analysis: definition, crossing over, map functions, phase, LOD scores, penetrance, phenocopies, liability classes, multi-point analysis, non-parametric analysis (sibpairs and pedigrees), quantitative trait analysis, determination of power for mendelian and complex trait analysis; Linkage Disequilibrium analyses: allelic association (case control designs and family bases studies), QQ and Manhattan plots, whole genome association analysis; population stratification; Quantitative Trait Analysis: measured genotypes and variance components. Hands-on computer lab experience doing parametric linkage analysis with the program LINKAGE, model free linkage analyses with Genehunter and Merlin, power computations with SLINK, quantitative trait anaylses with SOLAR, LD computations with Haploview and WGAViewer, and family-based and case-control association anaylses with PLINK and SAS. The methods and exercises are coordinated with the lectures and students are expected to understand underlying assumptions and limitations and the basic calculations performed by these computer programs. Auditors will not have access to the computer lab sessions. Prerequisite: M21-515 Fundamentals of Genetic Epidemiology. Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30-11:00am. Fall Semester.

Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 credits) M21-550
Intensive eleven-day summer course designed to provide broad exposure to the basic concepts, methodology and application of bioinformatics to solve biological problems, including basics of online genomic databases and database mining tools, mathematical algorithms in genome sequence analysis (alignment analysis, gene finding/predicting), gene expression microarray (genechip) analysis, and of the impact of recent developments such as protein microarrays or whole-genome DNA chips for genome-wide association studies. Students will also take computer labs and learn basics of bioinformatics tools and databases (BLAST/WUBLAST, Prospector, etc.), practice basics of R/Bioconductor programming, and apply specialized R packages to solve bioinformatics problems pertinent to real medical research of human diseases. Auditors will not have access to the computer lab sessions. M21-506, R Primer, is a prerequisite. Daily 9:00-4:30pm over 11 days. Summer Semester.

Population Genetics and Microevolution (3 credits) L41-4181*
An introduction to the basic principles of population and ecological genetics. Mechanisms of microevolutionary processes; integrated ecological and genetic approach to study the adaptive nature of the evolutionary process. Prerequisite: Bio 2970. Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

Health Behavior Courses

Addictions and Addictive Behaviors (3 credits) M19-562 Syllabus (pdf)
This course provides an overview of the principles of substance-related addictions and the processes and mechanisms that underlie addiction. Students will be introduced to the epidemiology and developmental course of addiction, risk and protective influences that act on the course of addiction and its adverse health consequences. Both genetic and environmental underpinnings will be discussed. The impact of policy and economics will be studied. Emerging addictive behaviors, effective interventions and treatment modalities will be discussed. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions, complete written assignments (review paper format) and present one of their written assignments via in-class presentation. Course activities: Lectures, class discussion, review paper presentation, and three short papers. Course note: M21-560 Biostatistics I or instructor approval to enroll. Thursdays 1:00-4:00pm. Spring Semester.

Evaluation of Health Services Programs (3 credits) M88-582 Syllabus (pdf)
Students are introduced to the fundamentals of program evaluation and learn about program evaluation methodology, methods of data collection and related measurement reliability and validity. Topics include: the link between program planning and program evaluation; evaluation research designs and their limitations; integrating process and outcome approaches; and utilization of evaluation results. Students also design an evaluation research proposal. Prerequisite M88-536 Health Education: Methods, Planning and Evaluation, Evening, Fall Semester.

Foundations of Health Care Research (3 credits) M88-524 Syllabus (pdf)
This course provides an overview of basic methodological concepts used in health care, social science, and behavioral science research. Students will develop an advanced understanding of all phases and components of the research process including generating research questions and hypotheses, designing a study, selecting a study sample, measuring variables and constructs, collecting data and planning data analysis. Prerequisite –prefer students take M88-525 Introduction to Biostatistics. Evening, Spring Semester.

Foundations of Public Health: Health Behavior and Health Education (3 credits) S55-5001*
The purpose of this course is to present fundamentals of social and behavioral science as a framework for using evidence-based approaches in addressing individual, families, and population health issues. Students will learn the role of social determinants of health problems, and theoretical approaches to guide the design and evaluation of health interventions. Pre-requisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038. Times and dates vary. Fall and Spring Semesters.

Health Behavior Theory (3 credits) M88-514 Syllabus (pdf)
Students learn and apply the determinants of health behavior and implement behavior change in clinical and community populations. The curriculum focuses on the theory and application of health promotion/education planning, implementation, and evaluation by health professions in a variety of settings. Primary emphasis is on research related to determinants of health behavior, plus strategies and techniques used by professionals to foster human health. Evening, Fall Semester.

Health Disparities: Applications in Clinical Settings (3 credits) M88-535 Syllabus (pdf)
Students learn how membership in a diverse/special group can impact health and health care; identify barriers to research participation; and effective strategies for improving recruitment efforts of minority and underserved populations. The curriculum also includes exploration of health care services and policies governing these services. Students are encouraged to give critical thought to the question of what it means to deliver culturally competent care. The goal of this course is to understand what it means to create environments (social and otherwise) that help to make individuals and communities healthy Evening, Offered in a blended (partial online) format. Summer Semester.

Health Education: Methods, Planning and Evaluation (3 credits) M88-536 Syllabus (pdf)
Students learn basic concepts of learning theory as they relate to health behavior and become familiar with the teaching/learning process, teaching methods, and selection of appropriate evaluation strategies. This class focuses on the role played by individual and community behavior as well as environmental and policy factors in preventing chronic and communicable diseases. Students who take this class have the knowledge and skills to plan, develop, implement, monitor and evaluate behavior change programs for improving health status. Students also learn how to assess the health needs of communities and organizations. Prerequisite M88-514 Health Behavior Theory Evening, Spring Semester.

Health Psychology (3 credits) M88-515 Syllabus (pdf)
Students explore the complex interactions between biological, psychological and social factors as they influence health, health behaviors and coping with illness. Topics will include the history and current roles of health psychology as a professional discipline, theoretical models of health and illness prevention with an emphasis on the bio-psychosocial model, stress, pain, and the role of bio-psychosocial factors in several specific medical illnesses including diabetes, asthma, heart disease and cancer. Evening, Semester varies.

Principles of Shared Decision Making and Health Literacy in the Clinical Setting (3 credits) M19-560 Syllabus (pdf)
This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to principles of shared decision making and health literacy and their implications for clinical communication. Topics may include basic and applied research on shared decision making, principles of designing and evaluating patient decision aids, principles of health literacy, research on relationship between health literacy, numeracy, and health outcomes, best practices for communication with low-numerate and low-literate individuals, best practices (and controversies) in communicating probabilities and their associated uncertainty about screening and treatment outcomes, and best practices for designing and evaluating written information for clinical populations (such as intake forms, brochures, and informed consent documents). Course activities: lectures, manuscript critiques, class project, and paper. Fridays 1:00-3:00pm. Spring semester.

Project Management in Clinical and Community Settings (3 credits) M88-508 Syllabus (pdf)
This course trains students in the day-to-day management of research projects and/or health behavior programs. Topics include: human subjects protection, participant recruitment & retention, working with teams, data collection, development and use of participant tracking databases, and other applied skills needed by project or program coordinators. The curriculum focuses on an overview of project management in health and community settings, including a review of ethics, data collection and management. Students develop skills for managing and coordinating all aspects of health behavior projects. Evening, Spring Semester.

Healthcare Administration and Quality Improvement Courses

Foundations of Public Health: Health Administration and Policy (3 credits) S55-5004*
Examines the American health care system from economic, political, and cultural perspectives. Focuses on medical care expenditures and payment, government involvement, national health insurance, and professional roles. Pre-requisite: S15-5040. Times and dates vary. Fall and Spring Semesters.

Fundamentals of Clinical Research Management (3 credits) U80-500
This hybrid online course provides the basic foundation for the application, concepts and theories of clinical research. We explore the historical evolution of research, linking it to current regulations and guidelines for good clinical practice. Additional course topics include research roles and responsibilities, institutional review boards, phases of drug development, the informed consent process, human subject protections, and an overview of study conduct. Students will complete institutional review board paperwork, including writing an informed consent and developing source documents. Tuesdays, 5:30-8:30pm. Fall Semester.

Healthcare Management (3 credits) B63-550I*
The goal of the course is to develop facility in applying basic tenets of general management to actual situations and dilemmas that might be faced by health care managers, consultants, financiers, investors, innovators, or providers in the course of their work. Issues addressed will include but not be limited to financial issues, management challenges, and conduct of operations. The first phase will cover the basic background on the structure and financing of the healthcare industry to include very brief reviews of critical topics like insurance and government-provided healthcare. A few basic frameworks will then be developed for students to apply to course topics moving forward, such as cost/benefit analysis and evaluation of risk. The remainder of the course will involve critical analyses of healthcare cases involving varied subjects and management challenges. Sessions will emphasize student led discussions. Mondays 6:15-9:15pm. Spring Semester.

Healthcare Reform and Policy (3 credits) U80-555
This course examines important and complex developments in contemporary health care policy. We begin with an historical overview, then look at the structure of current health care delivery, and identify political and economic challenges moving forward. In particular, we will critically examine methods and principles for evaluating health care costs and measuring policy effectiveness. The course also addresses unintended consequences of health care policies, special interests and political agendas, and the influence of major institutional forces on clinical and translational research. Cases studies and guest speakers will help illustrate current ethical dilemmas and other real challenges to contemporary health care and reform. Although this course meets over two weekends, students are expected to complete much of the course reading prior to the weekend sessions, and complete a paper after the weekend session. Friday, Saturday, Sunday “short course”, times vary. Spring Semester.

Leadership and Change in Health Care Services (3 credits) M88-562 Syllabus (pdf)
Students develop the leadership skills required for managing planned organizational change. Topics include personal effectiveness, team building, and creating learning environments in organizations. The course enables students to engage in the advanced study of leadership, integrating theory, research, and application in a diagnostic approach. Leadership skills are developed through group discussions, class exercises, case studies, and the application of organizational approaches to change and innovation. Evening, Fall Semester.

Patient Safety, Quality Management and Quality Improvement (3 credits) M19-526 Syllabus (pdf)
This course introduces principles of patient safety, quality measurement and quality improvement. Classes are designed to provide students with hands-on skills in systems thinking and in preventing, learning from, and dealing with medical error and adverse events. Students will also learn fundamentals in approaches to evaluating quality, including quantitative methods in measure development. We will discuss various approaches and challenges to knowledge translation and effective change management in improving quality. Students will be encouraged to use their real-world experiences in problem solving around patient safety concerns, to develop and evaluate quality measures in their respective fields and to develop a quality improvement project in their area of interest as part of the course. Wednesdays 9:00am-12:00pm. Spring Semester.

Principles of Management in Health Care Services (3 credits) M88-532 Syllabus (pdf)
This course enables students to explore the theoretical framework and practical application of classic management principles so to function effectively in a variety of organizational settings in the provision of healthcare services. Topics include the management process, managerial decision making and planning; negotiation skills; organization design; and leadership. Evening, Spring Semester.

Public and Global Health Courses

Foundations of Public Health: Environmental Health (3 credits) S55-5005*
This course presents a broad survey of the major environmental health issues facing contemporary society in first and third world countries. The course provides an overview of the interaction of the physical, psychological, and social environments of individuals in which they work and live. The course presents ecological concerns along with factors related to personal and community health. Times and dates vary. Fall and Spring Semesters.

Foundations of Public Health: Health Administration and Policy (3 credits) S55-5004*
Examines the American health care system from economic, political, and cultural perspectives. Focuses on medical care expenditures and payment, government involvement, national health insurance, and professional roles. Pre-requisite: S15-5040. Times and dates vary. Fall and Spring Semesters.

Foundations of Public Health: Health Behavior and Health Education (3 credits) S55-5001*
The purpose of this course is to present fundamentals of social and behavioral science as a framework for using evidence-based approaches in addressing individual, families, and population health issues. Students will learn the role of social determinants of health problems, and theoretical approaches to guide the design and evaluation of health interventions. Pre-requisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038. Times and dates vary. Fall and Spring Semesters.

Global Burden of Disease: Methods and Applications (3 credits) M19-5656 Syllabus (pdf)
This transdisciplinary course provides an overview of the quantitative and qualitative methods and their applications for studying the global burden of diseases. The topics cover infectious diseases, non-communicable chronic medical illness and behavioral disorders. At the end of this course, students will have learned basic methods used for global health research and major trends in global burden of diseases; they will be able to apply the knowledge of measurements to forecast the future of the global burden of specific diseases of interest to develop needed policy recommendations. Students will be able to address prevention and intervention strategies targeted to specific nations or regions using a transdisciplinary approach. Students will have learned major dimensions of sociocultural and economic factors that affect global and regional distributions of major disease categories and how they are linked to global trade and economy in some instances. The transdisciplinary knowledge and hands-on skills learned from this course will assist students with an interest in international research to select a disease or underlying condition with a significant burden on the population of diverse nations or regions. Students will acquire practical skills that can be used in the health professions, including cultural competency training as it applies to medicine and public health. Course activities: Lectures, transdisciplinary class discussion and exercises, homework, and transdisciplinary team presentations. Thursdays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

Global Health (3 credits) S55-5102*
This course provides an overview of issues in international health, with a particular emphasis on those affecting health in low-income countries. It will cover the infectious diseases of malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, and neglected tropical diseases (e.g. helminth infection). Chronic diseases and risk factors will also be addressed. An overview of the biology, epidemiology, and intervention evidence base will be covered, drawing from the Disease Control Priorities Project. Thursdays 9:00am-12:00pm. Spring Semester.

Statistical Courses

Applied Linear Modeling (3 credits) S55-5230
This course focuses on statistical modeling and analysis methods relevant to epidemiological and clinical research, as well as applied research in behavioral, social, and health sciences. A general linear models approach is taken to data analysis strategies using linear, logistic, and poisson regression, as well as ANOVA methods for repeated measures. Required Co-Requisite: Students enrolled in Section 01 MUST also enroll be enrolled in Lab A. Students enrolled in Section 02 MUST also enroll be enrolled in Lab B. Multiple sections available on different days, 5:30-7:30pm. Fall Semester.

Decision Analysis for Clinical Investigation and Economic Evaluation (3 credits) M19-540 Syllabus (pdf)
In this course, we will introduce students to the methods and applications of decision analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis in health care technology assessment, medical decision making, and health resource allocation. At the conclusion of the class, the student will have an understanding of the theoretical basis for economic evaluation and decision analysis, its application, and hands-on experience in the application of the methods. Among the topics covered are the development of a research question, choice of decision perspective, development of a decision analytic model, estimation of costs and benefits, use of preference based measures, addressing uncertainty and preparation of a manuscript presenting a decision analytic study. Fridays 9:00-12:00pm. Fall Semester.

Development, Validation, and Application of Risk Prediction Models (2 credits) M19-527 Syllabus (pdf)
This course will present an introduction to the methods of predictive modeling, with applications to both genetic and clinical data. Basic concepts and philosophy of supervised and unsupervised data mining as well as appropriate applications will be discussed. Topics covered will include multiple comparisons adjustment, cluster analysis, self-organizing maps, principal component analysis, and predictive model building through logistic regression, classification and regression trees (CART), multivariate adaptive splines (MARS), neural networks, random forests, and bagging and boosting. Approaches to validation will be discussed and strategies for estimation of added value with expanded variable lists will be a key focus of this applied quantitative methods course. Course note: Biostatistics I and II (M21-560 and M21-570) or equivalent required prerequisite. Mondays 2:00-4:00pm. Spring Semester.

Division of Public Health Sciences R Primer (1 credit) M19-513 Syllabus (pdf)
This is a short primer to introduce the R Statistical Environment to new users. R is a freely available language and environment for statistical computing and graphics which provides a wide variety of statistical and graphical techniques: linear and nonlinear modelling, statistical tests, time series analysis, classification, clustering, etc. The goal is to give students a set of tools to perform sophisticated statistical analysis in medicine, biology, or epidemiology.
Course note: This primer assumes a knowledge of basic statistics as taught in a first semester undergraduate or graduate sequence. Topics should include: probability, cross-tabulation, basic statistical summaries, and linear regression in either scalar or matrix form. Daily 8:30am-5:00pm for 1 week in Summer Semester.

Introduction to SAS for Clinical Research (1 credit) M19-510 Syllabus (pdf)
This one-week course is designed to equip medical students, clinicians and health researchers with basic SAS programming skills. Students will learn how to operate SAS, import external data, create SAS data sets, create, format and manipulate variables, and export data and results. Upon completion of this course, students will have obtained a basic understanding of the SAS environment. Important Note: You must have SAS loaded onto your computer by the first day of class. Required text: The Little SAS® Book: A Primer, Fifth Edition. Daily 9:00-12:00pm for 1 week in early Fall Semester.

Multilevel Models in Quantitative Research (3 credits) M19-530 Syllabus (pdf)
This course covers statistical model development with explicitly defined hierarchies. Such multilevel specifications allow researchers to account for different structures in the data and provide for the modeling of variation between defined groups. The course begins with simple nested linear models and proceeds on to non-nested models, multilevel models with dichotomous outcomes, and multilevel generalized linear models. In each case, a Bayesian perspective on inference and computation is featured. The focus of the course will be practical steps for specifying, fitting, and checking multilevel models with much time spent on the details of computation in the R and bugs environments.  Course note: This course assumes knowledge of basic statistics as taught in a first year undergraduate or graduate sequence. Topics should include: probability, cross-tabulation, basic statistical summaries, and linear regression in either scalar or matrix form. Knowledge of R, basic matrix algebra and calculus is helpful. Thursdays 4:00-6:00pm. Fall Semester.

Power and Sample Size (1 credit) M88-547 Syllabus (pdf)
Students learn the theoretical and practical aspects of how to calculate sample size for common study designs under various restraints – time, resources, etc. Students are provided an overview of statistical power computations for a variety of experimental and epidemiological study designs including single sample designs, two-sample designs, cohort designs, case-control designs and various other experimental designs based on the Analysis of Variance model. The concepts of statistical power, statistical precision, sample size and effect size are also reviewed. Prerequisite: M88-525 Introduction to Biostatistics. Over 2 Saturdays, 9:00am-5:00pm. Fall Semester.

R Primer (1 credit) M21-506 
This is a short primer to introduce the R Statistical Environment to new users. R is a freely available language and environment for statistical computing and graphics which provides a wide variety of statistical and graphical techniques: linear and nonlinear modeling, statistical tests, time series analysis, classification, clustering, etc. The goal is to give students a set of tools to perform statistical analysis in medicine, biology, or epidemiology. At the conclusion of this primer, students will: be able to manipulate and analyze data, write basic models, understand the R environment for using packages, and create standard or customized graphics. This primer assumes some knowledge of basic statistics as taught in a first semester undergraduate or graduate sequence. Topics should include: probability, cross-tabulation, basic statistical summaries, and linear regression in either scalar or matrix form. Daily 8:30am-5:00pm for 1 week in Summer Semester.

Randomized Controlled Trials (3 credits) M19-550 Syllabus (pdf)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to randomized controlled clinical trials. Topics include types of clinical trials research (efficacy and effectiveness trials), study design, treatment allocation, randomization and stratification, quality control, analysis, sample size requirements, patient consent, data safety and monitoring plans, reporting standards, and interpretation of results. Course activities: lectures, manuscript critiques, class project, and paper. Course note: Students are strongly encouraged to have taken or be concurrently enrolled in M19-511 or M17-522. Mondays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

Statistical Computing with SAS (2 credits) M21-503 Syllabus (pdf)
Intensive hands-on summer training in SAS® over 7 full weekdays. Students will learn how to use the SAS® System for handling, managing, and analyzing data. Instruction is provided in the use of the SAS® programming language, procedures, macros, and SAS® SQL. The course will include exercises using existing programs written by SAS® experts. Instruction manual and computer lab will be provided. This course meets the prerequisite for M21-560 Biostatistics I. Sit-ins and audit are not available; available for full credit only. Daily 9:00-5:00pm for 1 week in Summer Semester.

Survival Analysis (3 credits) M21-618
This course will cover the basic applied and theoretical aspects of models to analyze time-to-event data. Basic concepts will be introduced including the hazard function, survival function, right censoring, and the Cox-proportional hazards (PH) model with fixed and time dependent covariates. Additional topics will include regression diagnostics for survival models, the stratified PH model, additive hazards regression models and multivariate survival models. Permission of the Course Master required. Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:30-4:30pm. Spring Semester.

Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (3 credits) M19-551 Syllabus (pdf)
Introduction to the use of meta-analysis and related methods used to synthesize and evaluate epidemiological and clinical research in public health and clinical medicine. Concepts introduced and illustrated through case studies of public health and medical issues. Course activities: lectures, class discussion, group project, and paper. Course note: M21-570 or equivalent required prerequisite. Fridays 9:00am-12:00pm. Spring Semester.

Translational Medicine Courses

Bench Fundamentals for Translational Research (3 credits) M17-533 Syllabus (pdf)
This hybrid online course will introduce fellows-in-training and future physician scientists to the core principles of scientific investigation. This unique two-week intensive format will combine the theoretical knowledge with practical, hands-on application to provide students with an understanding of common and new innovative research approaches used in current scientific endeavors. Course lectures will highlight the following areas: molecular medicine; biospecimens and tissue banking; gene expression; immunoassays and controls; immunolocalization techniques; flow cytometry and cell sorting; cell signaling; sequencing technologies; microarray and related technologies; proteomics and mass spectroscopy; animal models and bioinformatics. The lectures will be complemented by hands-on laboratory experiences in tissue culture, protein extraction and blot, cell signaling and ELISA, PCR and electrophoresis; and plasmid purification. 2 weeks, Monday-Friday, 10:00am-4:00pm. Summer Semester.

Fundamentals of Mammalian Genetics (3 credits) L41-5285*
This course aims to provide both biologists and those with mathematical backgrounds with a basis in mammalian genetics. The course will include the following modules: Nucleic acid biochemistry; Gene and chromosome organization; Introduction to Human Genetics; Mutations and DNA repair; Cancer Genetics; Genomic methodologies; Biochemical genetics; Murine Genetics; Epigenetics; Neurodegenerative diseases; Mitochondrial disorders; Pharmacogenetics; Introduction to human population genetics; Applications of modern human genetics; Introduction to web-based informatics tools for molecular genetics. One of the required courses in the Quantitative Human Statistical Genetics graduate program. Tuesday and Thursday 3:30-5:00pm. Fall Semester.

Fundamentals of Molecular Cell Biology (4 credits) L41-5068*
This is a core course for incoming graduate students in Cell and Molecular Biology programs to learn about research and experimental strategies used to dissect molecular mechanisms that underlie cell structure and function, including techniques of protein biochemistry. Enrolling students should have backgrounds in cell biology and biochemistry, such as courses comparable to L41 Biol 334 and L41 Biol 4501. The format is two lectures and one small group discussion section per week. Discussion section focuses on original research articles. Tuesdays and Thursdays 8:30-10:00am, with a Wednesday Lab 3:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

ID Gateway: Translational and Public Health Aspects of Basic Infectious Disease Research (2 credits) L41-5426*
This course provides an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, infectious disease fellows and faculty to explore issues at the interface between patient care, public health and basic research in the area of microbial pathogenesis. Prerequisites, Application and L41 Bio 5392 or M30 526, or permission of instructor. Tuesdays 3:30-5:00pm. Spring Semester.

Immunobiology I (4 credits) L41-5053*
Immunobiology I and II are a series of two courses taught by the faculty members of the Immunology Program. These courses cover in depth modern immunology and are based on Janeway’s Immunobiology 8th Edition textbook. In Immunobiology I, the topics include: basic concepts in immunology, innate immunity: the first lines of defense, the induce responses of innate immunity, antigen recognition by B-cell and T-cell receptors, the generation of lymphocyte antigen receptors, antigen presentation to T lymphocytes and signaling through immune system receptors. In Immunobiogy II the topics include: the development and survival of lymphocytes, T cell-mediated immunity, the humoral immune response, dynamics of adaptive immunity, the mucosal immune system, failures of host defense mechanisms, allergy and allergic diseases, autoimmunity and transplantation, and manipulation of the immune response. These courses are open to graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students may take these courses upon permission of the coursemaster. Prereq: DBBS students and advanced undergraduates with permission. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 11:00am-12:00pm. Fall Semester.

Nucleic Acids & Protein Biosynthesis (3 credits) L41-548*
Fundamental aspects of the structure, biosynthesis, and function of nucleic acids and the biosynthesis of proteins. Emphasis on mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes and the regulation thereof. Lecture course supplemented with student discussions of research papers. Prerequisites: Biol 3371, Biol 451, Chem 481 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 10:30am-11:30pm. Fall Semester.

Randomized Controlled Trials (3 credits) M19-550 Syllabus (pdf)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to randomized controlled clinical trials. Topics include types of clinical trials research (efficacy and effectiveness trials), study design, treatment allocation, randomization and stratification, quality control, analysis, sample size requirements, patient consent, data safety and monitoring plans, reporting standards, and interpretation of results. Course activities: lectures, manuscript critiques, class project, and paper. Course note: Students are strongly encouraged to have taken or be concurrently enrolled in M19-511. Mondays 1:00-4:00pm. Fall Semester.

 

*This course is typically held on the Danforth Campus. Check WebSTAC to confirm location.